Let’s Get One Thing Straight

Hopefully by now you’ve found some sanity in your quarantine life, whether you’re in a “safe at home” state, participating in self-quarantine, or otherwise. If you read my previous post on how to get fun, full-bodied, curly hair, some of this may be a repeat, but in addition to comments from people struggling with how to keep curl in their hair, there’s the opposite problem that needs addressed: how to get frizzy hair smooth and straight. I use quite a few of the same or similar products as when curling my hair. Things like a smoothing serum or oil, and a heat protectant spray are what I would consider staples everyone should have.

Step 1: With dry hair, separate a section of hair, starting at the nape of your neck, pinning the rest out of the way. Smaller sections are ideal. It may seem like doing so will take you longer, but you won’t have to make as many passes with the flat iron on any particular section, also ensuring that there’s less damage caused. Spray your heat protectant across the entire layer, following up by using the straightener on a secotion about an inch to two inches wide. Small sections are also easier to manage.

Step 2: Once the first layer of hair has cooled (this only takes a few seconds), unclip your hair and section off another layer. Proceed with your heat protectant spray and flat iron.

Optional Step 3: If you tend to have pretty dry hair, finish by rubbing a small amount (pea sized or less) or smoothing serum or oil through those defrizzed locks!

Most people consider flat ironing much easier than curling. From my experience, those that tend to get frustrated with it, probably have one of the issues at the bottom of this post, or should try one of the tips in the next section.

A few tips to keep in mind:

  • If you like to let your hair air-dry, this works awesome when you’re going the curling iron route, but can make straightening your hair more of a challenge.
  • Make sure your hair is completely dry before using any kind of hot tool. Failing to do so will not only result in frustration that your hair isn’t becoming smooth like you want, but will also damage your hair.
  • If you have a section that is not completely smooth, don’t move on to the next layer of hair thinking your can just short cut it and cover it up. That little bit of wave is contagious! It’s why people tend to feel like they can never get their hair quite as smooth as their hair stylist does. *See the photos posted directly below.*
  • As you move the flat iron down to the the ends of you hair, give it the slightest curl. Not too much unless that’s what you’re going for; just the barely there curve will actually make your hair look straighter and it also disguises any split ends you may have!

Rumors and Myths Debunked
(Heard not just by clients but by a salon owner!)

  • Using a flat iron is not more damaging to your hair than a curling iron – they heat up to the same temperature. In fact, most newer straighteners even have temperature gages where you can see how hot it’s getting and lower it if you desire.
  • Just because it’s humid outside doesn’t mean you can’t get smooth hair! There are two things at play here: you’ve got to use the right product in addition to the flat iron if you’ve got any natural curl or frizz to your hair. Not doing so will result in your smooth hair returning to it’s roots (haha, see what I did there? Hair? Roots? Anyone?….ok moving on…) the minute you step out the door. The other issue that may result in poofy hair is that you’re not taking small enough sections as you use your flat iron. Slow down and be patient if you want that smoothness to last!

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